CLUB MEETINGS ARE HELD THE FIRST TUESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT THE

5 RIVERS DELTA RESOURCE CENTER (map) AT 7PM. SEE THE POSTS BELOW FOR MORE DETAILS!

To post information to this website or for further information about this website, just ask Tracy at tracy@thelannies.us
Current Club Coordinator: Tracy Lannie
MBCKC would like to express our appreciation to 5 Rivers and it's staff for all they do.

Disclaimer: This site provides general information & links on topics of paddling. Paddlesports can pose serious risks of damage to personal property & serious bodily injury including permanent disability & death. Anyone participanting in any MBCKC event or participating in any event mentioned on this website does so at their own risk and agrees to hold MBCKC harmless from any liability as a result of such participation or use of information contained herein.

Friday, September 27, 2002

Flash Paddle:
Saturday, September 28
Dauphin Island: Sand Island/ Little Dauphin Island
"Gee, look what the storm did" Tour.


Contact: Lisa Moore Haywood, ersmoore@bellsouth.net, 251-689-3934
Comments: Depending on conditions, we will either paddle around Little Dauphin Island or out to Sand Island. Meet at Ship & Shore Store (on right shortly after arriving on Island) at 10:00 a.m. for approximately three-hour tour. Bring snacks and skirt. All paddlers must determine for themselves if conditions are within their skill-level. Conditions should be mild, but you never know. PLEASE e-mail or call Lisa by 11:00 pm Friday if you plan to come. The meeting point could change and Lisa won't know to advise you. Hope to see a lot of curious paddlers Saturday.

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!!!!!!!!!!!!!MEETING REMINDER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
The next meeting of the MBCAKC will be on Tuesday, October 1, 2002, at 7 p.m., at the Fairhope Yacht Club. John and Kathy Mitchell will do a presentation on their recent trip to Alaska. Meetings are held the first Tuesday of each month, same time, same place.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

General Information:


1. We e-mail our monthly newsletter to anyone who requests it from Gene at boothecg@bellsouth.net. Gene also snail-mails our newsletter to those members who request it. Contact Gene if you would like to receive a newsletter in either format.

2. We are a group of people who enjoy paddling and also enjoy sharing our experiences with others. We are not a formal organization. There are no dues, no application forms, no membership lists (other than Gene's e-mail list). All you have to do to "join" our "club" is send Gene your e-mail address, show up at a paddle, come to a meeting, or just decide you're a member.

3. Our intention is for safety to always be the first priority. It is up to each individual to decide for him/herself whether or not the paddling conditions for each event are within their enjoyment and skill range. Everyone must be responsible for their decision as to whether or not to participate in each event. The coordinator of the paddle should be able to assist with information on the expected paddle conditions. However, always remember that the weather and other conditions can, and quite often do, change both quickly and dramatically. (In other words, paddle at your own risk.)

4. It is always a good idea to contact the trip coordinator for any paddling trip to let them know if you plan to attend. They can contact you with important information, such as trip cancellation, etc. Also, thanks to the paddlers who choose to carry a trash bag to collect rubbish along the way. They make it nicer for everyone.

Contact list:

If you want to get on our e-mail list, please e-mail Gene at boothecg@bellsouth.net.

If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions about this website, or want to post something on this website, please e-mail Julie at jrobber@worldnet.att.net.

Click here to go to the West Florida Canoe Club webpage.

-----------------------

Reminder: Permit for Boiling Creek

A current permit is required to paddle Boiling Creek in Eglin Air Force Base. The permits are good from 1 October to 30 September. They cost $5.00. You get a map along with the permit that is worth more than the fee.

Request the Recreational Permit, which is the one for paddling. You can get the permit from one of the gates or by mail. Permits may be obtained from the Jackson Guard Office (Natural Resources Branch), located at Highway 85 North, Niceville FL 32578 (850) 882-4164. The mailing address is:

Eglin Natural Resources Branch
107 Highway 85 North
Niceville, FL 32578

For each permit requested, send a photocopy of either a driver's license or identification card which contains full name, current address (including zip code), current phone number, and date of birth. Specify the type of permit (recreational) desired. Be prepared to wait three weeks for delivery (though recent turn-arounds have been only a few days). Payments can be by personal check, money order, or cashiers check made payable to DFAS-LI Eglin AFB. Cash is not accepted.

Thursday, September 26, 2002

Paddle Report : D'Olive Creek September 23, 2002

Between weather systems, a cold front had just passed and Tropical Storm Isidore was threatening, Larry Sr. and I went for an afternoon paddle from Daphne Bay Front Park to the end of D'Olive Creek. The put in at the park is looking better each time we go. The construction projects at the park appear to be done for now. The waterfront is clean with a soft sand beach, and the day we went we had plenty of water depth. At lower tide levels, shell banks can slow one down.

Paddling north from the park, we noticed waterfowl over to the west. We passed the Lake Forest Yacht Club on our right. The shoreline northward of the yacht club has an increasing number of trees. A thick stand of cypress with some Spanish moss hugs the water's edge and grows taller than the bluff behind it. Open water closes in due to a wedge of marsh that extends out from shore in front of the Hampton Inn almost all the way up to the Interstate - 10 Bayway.

North of the Bayway we spotted and explored three short waterways into the reeds. The first waterway cuts a little to the north west and ends up at the causeway if you can get that far. The second waterway meanders through the reeds and floating plants and flowering vines. It got shallower and shallower in the marsh. The third waterway was rather open initially and went into an area with some cypress trees growing out of the the water below the bluff at Spanish Fort. This waterway was better hidden and completely unexpected to me. Here we surprised several birds and turtles resting on branches.

We backed out and crossed south of the Bayway to pick up the mouth of D'Olive Creek. The creek comes around the north side of the Hampton Inn and we paddled toward the Highway 98 bridge and the Main Street bridge in Daphne. The water here was rather scummy, but it had no particular odor. As we passed under the Main Street bridge the water improved and we startled the first of four large alligators we encountered in this creek. All the gators were resting singly on or near the north bank. We passed into the trees and held to the right side of the creek as much as we could; my goal was to get to the dam in Lake Forest and I know that we needed to take a right branch of the creek to get there.

The trees hang over the creek and make nice canopy in places. The air is noticeably cooler in there compared with the bay air. We meandered around tree limbs touching the water and tree trunks in the water for perhaps four hundred yards and came out into the open at the dam. The lake behind the dam must be full for the water was trickling over the top in several places as well as rushing out the spillway, aerating the water below the dam. Behind the dam lies a long lake with homes and apartments along the shore and no
public access. Perhaps we could return to the dam later and portage over to the lakeside?

The return to the bay was uneventful. We took our time to explore the marsh in front of the Hampton Inn. At one point we caused a flock of white ibises to take flight; they tried to go straight up! Small gators and big fish splashed as we crossed near them. The section of this paddle I liked best was the cypress trees along the bluff. They are old and wild and many great blue herons roost in the limbs. We can paddle right up to the trees with no problem.

We were back at the park 2 hours after we left. This is a fine short trip for any level of paddler.

Monday, September 23, 2002

!!!!!!!!!!Notice!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Set your VCR to record WKRG 5 News (on channel 5) this Wednesday Sept. 25th at 6pm. Jere Hough's County Road 5 should air (highlighting our club). (That is if there are no major problems like a hurricane.)

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Gene is having e-mail problems, so he is temporarily unable to send out reminders and such. Please stay tuned to this web page, and I will try to keep you informed until Gene gets sorted out.

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Paddle Report: Full Moon Paddle, Buzbee's Fish Camp on Bay Minette Creek, Friday, September 20, 2002
by Gene Boothe

I always worry if I am spelling that word correctly. Anyway, when Bob announces that his paddle is for 6:30, he doesn't mean to be driving up then. That is when the flotilla was taking off. However, I wasn't the last one to arrive. At one time I counted 25 boats. We met the 26th on the way back in.

You get to the fish camp by taking Hwy. 225 north off of 31 in Spanish Fort. Go a little over a mile until you are going downhill toward Bay Minette Creek. The fish camp is to the right immediately prior to crossing the bridge. The husband and wife proprietors live on the site and will meet you to collect the $3.00 boat launch fee. They are long time residents and their company during the launch is part of the enjoyment of the trip. This is a very secure location in which to park your automobile.

Bay Minette Creek is to the north of the launch and is another good paddle. We headed west into the sunset, under the bridge, toward Bay Minette Bay. Carolyn and I were in a tandem (two person) kayak. I temporarily lost interest in the beautiful skyline when my rudder jammed, turning us toward the hornet nest overhanging the creek and Carolyn kept paddling.

Cypress Point is a prominent point of land on the south bank, where the shoreline takes a sharp turn to the left (south). We often see osprey fishing near here. This is where the Confederate defenses of Spanish Fort were breached by the northern troops during the closing days of the war. On our last moonlight paddle here, we took a right at this spot and headed about a half of a mile north into Bay Minette Basin to watch the sunset. This night, Bob led us straight ahead about a mile further into Bay Minette Bay. There was a reed island ahead of us, which we rounded to the right. This took us through a scenic channel among the reeds. If you paddle this on your own, you can go a more direct route left around the island, but this is where the motorboat traffic will be if there is any.

We paddled near the right shore (of reeds) into a striking sunset, highlighted by small rain clouds rimmed in spots with orange. The full moon rose over the tree line behind us.

Bay Minette Bay terminates at a point on the north shore (of reeds) called Cedar Point. There is a channel beyond this point leading south into the Blakeley River. Most of whatever boat traffic there in passes through here. Bob led us right, from this spot, into a little finger of water called Yancey Bay. There were small clumps of trees silhouetted against the sky. The light was plenty bright enough to see the water and outline of the shore, but not to look for flowers. In a short while, we paddled into a cut (think ditch) through the reeds, often used by fishermen to get into Blakeley River about a 1,000 yards away, called Fishermen Cut. The cut maybe averaged ten feet wide. It was striking to suddenly emerge into the wide-open Blakeley. The visibility may have been over a mile on the water, at least we could see across the river and the car lights on the causeway to the south.

All the water on the paddle was flat and calm, although the tide was noticeably flowing north at a fast enough rate to require us keep paddling south to remain in the area. We didn't want to lose track of where the cut through the reeds was, as that was the way back home. We stayed in the area, paddling south then drifting north, bumping in to old friends and meeting new ones in the moonlight. This is always one best parts of the trip, especially when a tray of special snacks somehow emerges from the cockpit of Peggy's kayak. The loud pop that broke the silence was not an after hours duck hunter, but a bottle of Robert Mondavi Chardonnay.

The paddle back was refreshingly uneventful, just screen and beautiful. We met boat number 26 on the west side of the reed island by Cypress Point. We all made it back in. It didn't seem to take any time to load the boats, everyone helped everyone else. This may not come as a surprise to some, but the last rendezvous of the evening was at the Original Oyster House on the causeway. Join us next time. There is always plenty of room.

Sunday, September 22, 2002

Trip Report - Boiling Creek - Wednesday, September 18
by Larry McDuff

Five Slackers in four kayaks and a solo canoe turned out for the Boiling Creek Trip led by Bob Andrews. We met at the Oasis truck stop on I-10, loaded kayaks belonging to me, Nancy, and Lacey in Bob's truck, and drove to Florida with Peggy in the shuttle vehicle. Peggy left her car at the Highway 87 bridge across the Yellow River. With her kayak loaded on Bob's truck we all piled in and drove on Eglin dirt roads to Boiling Creek.

For those of you who haven't been there, this water is like something coming out of a Florida limestone spring - clear, cool, and flowing rapidly. On a hot day Bob wasted no time in pronouncing the first swim call, a call that was to be repeated often as we drifted downstream.

The fall flowers were spectacular, with pitcher plants along Boiling Creek and Cardinal flowers on the Yellow River among my favorites. We took a side hike on a sandy bottom stream where we saw beaver signs, a deer trail, and a small carniverous plant whose name I don't remember. Peggy brought a picnic table and hot dogs which we set up in Bob's canoe for lunch. The vegetarians feasted on Nancy's cantelope and carrots.

After a final swim in the swift-flowing Yellow River and a final Bob Andrews scenic detour which was actually a short cut, we arrived at the take-out. While Bob and Peggy went to get Bob's truck, the rest of us talked to two guys who had just bought a motorboat and were launching it for the first time. They told Nancy they couldn't pay their rent, but at least they now had a motor boat.

Maybe next time they will buy a kayak AND pay the rent.
Paddle Report on Johnsons Beach September 20, 2002
by Bruce Zimmerman

How to get there: From Alabama take U.S. 98 east into Florida and turn south (right) on 293. Take 292 (Sorrento Road) right and cross the bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway. Look for Johnsons Beach Road on the left just before 292 makes a sweeping turn to the right . Follow Johnsons Beach Road into the park.

Gulf Islands National Seashore

Ann and Larry McDuff took the lead on this trip to Johnsons Beach, a part of Gulf Islands National Seashore. They planned to camp there the night before and paddle the bayside the next day.

The weather had been quite humid, but on the night of the 19th the wind was kicking 15 to 20 mph which made a delightful cooling effect on the beach. Surf on the Gulfside was breaking about 3 feet high making a pretty good roar. On the bayside the water was just about dead calm, not mirror smooth, but calm with some ripples for texture. An almost full moon rose above the horizon after 6 p.m. The fresh sea air drove away biting insects and city smells.

The park rules specify parking half a mile west of the end of the road and primitive camping begins half a mile east of the end of the road past a PVC pipe marker labeled F. We dropped our packs at the end of the road and went back to park the car in the legal zone. The walk back to our gear was easy on flat pavement. We were walking along with a view of sunset colors on remnants of cumulus clouds and the moon peeking out brightly between them. We picked up our packs and took the last of the many wooden crossover walkways to the Gulfside beach and hiked east in the twilight. The moonlight enabled us to read the PVC markers easily and once we found the F marker ( F had a companion marker, a larger striped pole) we hiked a little farther to a high open area without vegetation (another park rule is don't camp on vegetation) to set up camp.

Ann and Larry had arrived earlier and paddled with their gear to find a campsite. I think that is a spendid alternative to hiking because they had their boats with them and had the option of a twilight paddle on the bay. Ann and Larry really know how to have the most fun. The night was great for sleeping, even out in the open.

Just after dawn, a civilian helicopter treated us to an overflight at 20 feet altitude.

We hiked back to the car and drove to the park pavilion for rest rooms and a picnic table breakfast. The road had several joggers out and about. A family from Lillian arrived at the pavilion after us and split up to go exploring the facility in different directions.

We returned to the crossover where Larry's car was parked, the last crossover on the bayside. The crossover made the portage down to the water easy. We could see a kayaker coming from the east as we set down the first boat on the sand. By the time we brought down the second boat, Larry was beaching his Shenai next to the first boat we set down. Good timing, Larry.

We paddled east along the bayshore to meet up with Ann who had stayed at the campsite. The bayside water was clear, easily 6 foot visibility near the shoreline and better visibility off the beach. The bottom varied between light colored sand and dark colored eel grass. The cleanliness of the water, I thought, was comparable to Joseph Bay. From our vantage point on the water, the reason for the rule to camp half a mile from the end of the road was more apparent. Hurricane damage to the dune system was still evident in that first half mile stretch of beach. In several places, wash through left a gaping hole in the dune line. Further eastward, the dune size was higher, and the dune vegetation was more mature.

The four of us paddled on to the east towards Langley Point and two coves. Rounding Langley point, we noticed four white cylindrical buoys across the mouth of the cove prohibiting combustion engines inside the cove. We paddled in and Larry who was in the lead called out Look at the rays! A pair of brown colored rays with about a three foot wingspan and long slender black tails came flying underwater towards us. The water was shallow and clear giving this cove an aquarium look. This cove also held a sailboat wreck five feet above the tideline. We stopped to take a look at it close up.

We departed, finishing paddling the inside of this cove and returned to the bay and our eastward track. We could see on the north shore pretty houses which at this distance look like colorful boxes in the trees. Some big boats cruised the channel on the north side leaving the southside for us and small fishing boats trolling with electric motors. We took our lunch and a swim at Redfish Point. The day was sunny and warm so the swim refreshed us. Further to the east, a high island of white sand rose out of the bay, a spoil bank, somewhat like that at Gravine Island. It was tempting to go look, but we decided to save that for next time. We had had enough sun and fun for the day. We paddled back eager for a freshwater shower at the park pavillion.

Thursday, September 19, 2002

Late-breaking news:

Roll and Self-Rescue Class, Tuesday, September 24, 2002 at 6:00 PM at the Fairhope Yacht Club (FYC).

Canoe/Kayak 3-Day Camping Trip to Okefenokee Swamp with the West Florida Canoe Club, October 17, 18, 19, & 20. These paddles will be day trips based out of Stephen Foster State Park (1 800 864-7275), approximately seventeen miles NE of Fargo Georgia. Camp and paddle out of there for three nights. There are eight cabins on site, which are all booked at this time. Call the state park for reservations. Contact Bob [W/H= (251) 344-8664, C = (251) 367-4144] to let him know if you are coming and any for additional information needed.

This will be on flat water and all levels of experience should enjoy the paddles. As I understand this, Arrive Thursday, prior to the gates being locked at 7:00PM Eastern Time. Friday and Saturday, paddle swamp canoe trails on the upper Suwannee River. Sunday, depart for home, trying to paddle the most beautiful River in Florida, the Ichetucknee, on the way.

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The wind recording for Mobile Bay may be on-line again. Check it out at 990-JIBE.

John and Kathy Mitchell will present a video of their recent trip to Alaska at our next club meeting, October 1, at 7:00 p.m. at the Fairhope Yacht Club.

Tuesday, September 17, 2002

Paddle Reminder Friday, September 20 (Full Moon)
Contact: Bob Andrews at 367-4144
Place: Buzbee's
Time: 6:30 PM
Comments:Bring a light, snacks, and fluids. Bug spray would be a good idea also. Please call Bob in case the weather doesn't cooperate.
Roll Class Wednesday, September 18
Contact: Bob at 367-4144
Place: Fairhope Yacht Club
Time: 5:30 PM
Comments: Bob and Jeff are once again offering this class to us free of charge. You can't find a better price or instruction.
Paddle Reminder
Wednesday, September 18: Boiling Creek
Contact: Bob Andrews at 367-4144

Friday, September 13, 2002

Kayaks for sale:
Larry Mickelsen, Sr. has two kayaks for sale: (1) a Pacific Northwest Designs "Kwanat," which is a 10-foot long, blue, sit-on-top, for $250 or best offer, and (2) an Aquaterra "Chinook" yellow sea kayak, for $500 or best offer. Phone # 990-3044.

Thursday, September 05, 2002

A late addition to September's Calendar of Events:

September 22, Sunday: Smith Bayou

Contact: Matt Darring w341-1712(MWFSat) or h343-1196.
Time: 9:30 AM
Place: meet at Bruno's on 225 and 31 in Spanish Fort
Comments: An all day paddle at a moderate pace. Please call Matt for details.

Wednesday, September 04, 2002

SEPTEMBER CALENDAR OF EVENTS

We are strongly encouraged to call the trip "contact" before showing up for a paddle. If the leader doesn't know we are coming, the leader cannot keep us informed of important changes in trip plans, including time, place, and cancellation. Trip leaders can also provide information regarding the skill level of the paddle, whether to bring food, etc.

September 7, Saturday: Caring Cup Regatta
Contact: Carolyn Boothe 928-1107
Place: Fairhope Yacht Club
Cost: $15 to benefit the kids of the Eastern Shore
Comments: Times and other information are posted on the bulletin board at the Fairhope Yacht Club, or contact Carolyn for additional information. After the days events, including paddling and sailing, there will be a party with entertainment by Rondell and the Kit-Kats.

September 10, Tuesday: Delta Paddle
Contact: Carl Haywood 689-3935
Place: Meet at Tensaw Eco Tours on the Causeway, next to the Blue Gill
Comments: Contact Carl for further information.

September 18, Wednesday: Boiling Creek
Contact: Bob Andrews h/w 344-8664 cell: 367-4144
Comments: This paddle is a club favorite. You will need a current recreational permit for Eglin Air Force Base to participate in this paddle. Instructions for obtaining such a permit appear below, in our club "FAQs."

September 20, Friday: Full Moon Paddle
Contact: Bob Andrews h/w 344-8664 cell: 367-4144
Comments: This will probably be in the Delta. Stay tuned to this web page and/or contact Bob for further details.

September 20, Friday: Johnson Beach
Contact: Larry McDuff, 928-1582
Place: Johnson Beach, in the Gulf Island National Seashore, on the eastern end of Perdido Key, in Florida. Put in will be on the bayside, at the last walkway on the left.
Time: 9:00 a.m.
Cost: There is an $8 fee to enter Johnson Beach, or $25 for an annual pass to the Gulf Island National Seashore.
Comments: Call first. Bring lunch. Camping is permitted on Johnson Beach, so you can also spend the night before and/or after the paddle on the beach. Larry plans to spend the night of Thursday, September 19 on the Gulf side.

September 21, Saturday: Little River
Leader: Mark 458-7574
Time: 8:30 a.m.
Place: Stagecoach restaurant in Stockton
Comments: A downriver float with a shuttle. The Little River is very pretty this time of year. Expect to be out of the water by about 3:30 or 4 p.m.

Lisa also plans flash paddles off Dauphin Island and at Big Creek Lake during the month of September. Stay tuned to this web page or contact Lisa for further details: 689-3934, ersmoore@bellsouth.net

Our next meeting will be on October 1, same time, same place, and will include a presentation on the Rio Grande.

Monday, September 02, 2002

!!!!!!!!!MEETING REMINDER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The next meeting of the Mobile Bay Canoe & Kayak Club will be held on Tuesday, September 3, 2002, at 7:00 p.m., at the Fairhope Yacht Club. Curt Burdick and Joe Cuhaj will speak to us about their new book Paddling Alabama.
Meetings are held on the first Tuesday of every month, same time, same place.

Everyone and anyone is welcome at our meetings. We are a very informal group, with no dues, no membership lists, and no special requirements for "membership" in our "club." We just like to paddle and get together once a month to review and plan paddles, talk about paddling, and maybe even learn something about paddling.

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FYI, Lisa did find manatees during her paddle yesterday from McNally Park. And you might too, if you go paddling in that area. Please remember that it is illegal to harass manatees in any way. If a manatee (or any other wildlife) changes its behavior because of your presence, then you are probably closer to it than you should be. Let's all do our part to ensure that manatees and other wildlife continue to visit our area.

------------

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

General Information:


1. We e-mail our monthly newsletter to anyone who requests it from Gene at boothecg@bellsouth.net. Gene also snail-mails our newsletter to those members who request it. Contact Gene if you would like to receive a newsletter in either format.

2. We are a group of people who enjoy paddling and also enjoy sharing our experiences with others. We are not a formal organization. There are no dues, no application forms, no membership lists (other than Gene's e-mail list). All you have to do to "join" our "club" is send Gene your e-mail address, show up at a paddle, come to a meeting, or just decide you're a member.

3. Our intention is for safety to always be the first priority. It is up to each individual to decide for him/herself whether or not the paddling conditions for each event are within their enjoyment and skill range. Everyone must be responsible for their decision as to whether or not to participate in each event. The coordinator of the paddle should be able to assist with information on the expected paddle conditions. However, always remember that the weather and other conditions can, and quite often do, change both quickly and dramatically. (In other words, paddle at your own risk.)

4. It is always a good idea to contact the trip coordinator for any paddling trip to let them know if you plan to attend. They can contact you with important information, such as trip cancellation, etc. Also, thanks to the paddlers who choose to carry a trash bag to collect rubbish along the way. They make it nicer for everyone.

Contact list:

If you want to get on our e-mail list, please e-mail Gene at boothecg@bellsouth.net.

If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions about this website, or want to post something on this website, please e-mail Julie at jrobber@worldnet.att.net.

Click here to go to the West Florida Canoe Club webpage.

-----------------------

Reminder: Permit for Boiling Creek

A current permit is required to paddle Boiling Creek in Eglin Air Force Base. The permits are good from 1 October to 30 September. They cost $5.00. You get a map along with the permit that is worth more than the fee.

Request the Recreational Permit, which is the one for paddling. You can get the permit from one of the gates or by mail. Permits may be obtained from the Jackson Guard Office (Natural Resources Branch), located at Highway 85 North, Niceville FL 32578 (850) 882-4164. The mailing address is:

Eglin Natural Resources Branch
107 Highway 85 North
Niceville, FL 32578

For each permit requested, send a photocopy of either a driver's license or identification card which contains full name, current address (including zip code), current phone number, and date of birth. Specify the type of permit (recreational) desired. Be prepared to wait three weeks for delivery (though recent turn-arounds have been only a few days). Payments can be by personal check, money order, or cashiers check made payable to DFAS-LI Eglin AFB. Cash is not accepted.

Sunday, September 01, 2002


Possible change in plans:

Lisa advises that the weather forecast does not look good for viewing the manatees this afternoon, so it may be necessary to cancel the flash paddle she posted on this webpage yesterday. If you were planning to go on this paddle, please call Lisa before 4:30 at 689-3934 to discuss the weather situation. If you try to meet her at the put-in without calling first, you may be the only person there. :-)

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I (Julie) am back in town and will see all of you at the meeting on Tuesday, if not before. Feel free to call me if you need anything posted on this webpage.